Culture

We will protect, promote, and strengthen the culture that brings people together and makes us strong.

In the last four years, we’ve made the biggest reinvestments in our cultural and creative industries in Canada’s history – investments that have helped stabilize CBC/Radio-Canada, given more direct support to artists, and created more good jobs for the talented people who tell our stories.

200 credit for children to explore culture

To ensure that more people have access to Canadian culture here and around the world, and to ensure that Canadian artists can continue to tell our stories, we will:

  • introduce the Culture Pass, a $200 credit that every Canadian child will receive when they turn 12, to be used to access theatres, museums, galleries, workshops, and other cultural venues and local Canadian content;
  • strengthen the regional mandate of CBC/RadioCanada, so that local stations can broadcast more local news; and require CBC/Radio-Canada to open up its digital platform, so that journalism start-ups and community newspapers can access affordable technology to develop and distribute local content;
  • continue to support Canadian film by increasing annual funding for Telefilm Canada by nearly 50 per cent a year;
  • review our national museums policy to make sure that people can access Canadian history across the country, with better access to digital collections; and will move forward with making the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Heritage Centre into a national museum
  • introduce a new Cultural Diplomacy strategy, with at least one international mission each year to promote Canadian culture and creators around the world; and
  • move forward, in our first year, with legislation that will take appropriate measures to ensure that all content providers – including internet giants – offer meaningful levels of Canadian content in their catalogues, contribute to the creation of Canadian content in both official languages, and promote this content and make it easily accessible on their platforms.

Preserving Canada’s heritage is essential to understanding the history of our communities, and to fostering a sense of connection between people, yet current legislation offers little direction on how Canada’s heritage places are designated and protected, putting the preservation and care of these important places at risk.

To provide clearer direction on how national heritage places should be designated and preserved, we will move forward with new comprehensive heritage legislation on federally owned heritage places.